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English Course Descriptions


Writing and Speech Courses (ENG)

A non-credit course in writing sentences and paragraphs to enable poorly prepared students to improve their writing skills before being placed in the regular composition course. Students who score below 480 on the writing section of the SAT, or below 16 on the English section of the ACT, and all international students whose first language is not English will be tentatively enrolled in the course ENG 050. The course seeks to make the students proficient in writing acceptable English sentences, paragraphs, and brief essays. At or before the end of the semester, students will submit their three best pieces of writing to the English Department. Any student whose writing is inadequate must take Basic Writing again. Those whose writing is now considered acceptable will be able to enroll in ENG 111. No hours of credit toward graduation. Only offered on a credit/no credit basis.

The students’ goal in this course is to learn to write effective expository prose. The course will focus on the writing process, including building a fund of ideas, learning how to organize thought, writing and rewriting, analyzing and evaluating, and sharing writing. Students will gain proficiency in the writing of sentences, paragraphs and essays. Must be completed during the first year at Covenant. Three hours.

An introductory course designed to help students acquire and practice writing skills and to encourage the development of a Christian perspective on news gathering and news writing. Two hours.

An introductory course designed to help students to deliver effective public speeches. The course includes both a study of rhetorical principles and practice in delivering speeches. Two hours. ‘S’

A course in writing fiction, especially the short story. Prerequisite: ENG 111, English Composition, with a grade of B or higher, or permission of instructor. Two hours.

A course in writing various forms of poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 111. English Composition with a grade of "B" or higher, or permission of instructor. Two hours.

A course in the principles of creative writing and their practice in creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENG 111. English Composition with a grade of "B" or higher, or permission of instructor. Two hours.

A course in the analysis and practice of prose composition. The emphasis will be on expository writing, such as the informal and formal essay, reviews and critiques. Enrollment limited to 15 students, ordinarily not open to freshmen; priority is given to students who have already shown competency and promise in writing and to English majors who seek Georgia secondary school certification. Prerequisite: ENG 111. Two hours. ‘W’

A course in the analysis of prose composition and a study of methods of teaching the writing process. This course may be taken twice to meet the writing distribution requirement for an English major. Spring semester. Prerequisite: ENG 111, English Composition, with a grade of “B” or higher. Two or three hours. Students may take the optional third hour with the recommendation of a faculty member and the permission of the instructor. The third hour will cover methods of tutoring and will include a tutoring practicum in the Writing Center.

In this course, students will explore hypertext theory and acquire basic web design skills to convert print-based papers and essays into hypertext, producing effective, useable, attractive web-based documents. Prerequisites: Eng 111, and at least one literature course which required a research paper. Two hours.

This course provides a practical application of journalistic concepts and techniques. Students may work on campus for a student publication or an administrative office, in the community as opportunities are available, or in various internships available through the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities in Washington, D.C. Advance planning is essential. Prerequisites: ENG 245, the recommendation of the journalism instructor, and the permission of the English Department. One to three hours.

 

Literature Courses (ENG)

An introduction to the major genres of literature and the techniques of study appropriate to them. Designed especially for prospective English majors and minors, this course will enhance students' ability to read with enjoyment and understanding and will give them practice in analyzing and writing about works of Western and non-Western literature. Prerequisite: ENG 111.Three hours. "W" and HUM

This course will broaden students' knowledge of poetry and prose from colonial times through the first great flowering of American literature in the mid-nineteenth century. Special attention will be given to the American sources of the great nineteenth-century writers, to the works of Douglass, Emerson, Poe, Thoreau, Dickinson and Whitman, and to the short fiction of Hawthorne and Melville. Three hours. HUM

This course will broaden students’ knowledge of American poetry and prose when it became one of the most important literary traditions of the world. Particular attention will be paid to the rise of literary modernism, imagism in poetry, and realism and naturalism in fiction. Connections with themes established in the earlier period will be explored. Three hours.HUM

A study of ancient Greek and Roman literature in English translation with emphasis on the epic and the drama. Attention will be given to the development of Greek and Roman thought. Three hours. HUM

The study of works from European literature since the classical era. The focus may be on a single major author (e.g., Dante, Cervantes, Goethe), on a national literature (French, Russian, etc.), on a particular form of literature (drama, novel, romance, etc.), or on a particular idea (the image of man, concepts of society, etc.). Three hours. HUM

A study of C. S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Charles Williams, and other writers of their circle. The focus will be mainly on prose fiction, though poetry or non-fiction may be included. May be taken by non-majors for humanities credit. Three hours. HUM

This course will explore the nature of film as a medium, of cinema as a language, and of the motion picture as a force in modern culture. In studying the history of the medium, the class will discuss the development of photographic technology, of cinematic language, of various genres, and of artistic schools. These ideas will be demonstrated in studying the films of directors like Griffith, Eisenstein, Chaplin, Renoir, Welles, Rossellini, Fellini, Bergman, Antonioni, and Hitchcock. Three hours. FA

This course will broaden students’ knowledge of the American novel through various periods of the American literary tradition: gothicism, romanticism, realism, naturalism, modernism, and metafiction. Students will study works by authors such as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Dreiser, Cather, Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Ellison. Three hours.

A study of African-American fiction of the twentieth century, with an emphasis on close reading of prominent texts of the Harlem Renaissance and contemporary authors. Attention will be given to historical, cultural, social and gender issues. Three hours.HUM

In this course students will encounter literature from both non-American and American minority cultures. Students will become aware of many authors who may not be included in the western canon. Course content will include works from a culture of origin and will follow the development of the literature through immigration and, finally, to the group’s establishment as American citizens with a literary voice. Attention will be given to historical, cultural, social, and gender issues. Three hours. HUM

A sophomore-level study of material not treated elsewhere in the curriculum. Topics may include the following: the mass media, literature and comtemporary problems, or the study of particular authors in their own settings. Three hours.

A study of the rise of the English novel in the eighteenth century, the rapid growth and expansion of the novel in the nineteenth century, and the development of the modern novel. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

A study of the art of Chaucer and of selected works from Old and Middle English literature with some attention to the social and literary backgrounds of their work. The works of Chaucer will be read in Middle English, the other works in Modern English translation. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

A study of the works of representative writers of the period, with special attention given to major authors such as Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, and Milton. Prerequisite: ENG 201, or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

A study of major British writers from 1660 and 1790 with special attention to satire and the rise of the novel. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

A study emphasizing the English Romantic writers from Blake to Keats. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

A study of major English poets, novelists, and non-fiction prose writers from 1830 to the end of the century. The beginnings of modern poetry as seen in Hardy and Yeats will also be studied. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

The same course as ENG 203, but with additional assignments for upper-division credit. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

The same course as ENG 204, but with additional assignments for upper-division credit. Prerequisite: ENG 201, or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

A study of representative works of poetry and fiction in English and American literature from 1965 to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

A survey of various contemporary, schools of literary criticism and theories of reading. Some of the following theories will be discussed: structuralism, reader-response criticism, feminist criticism, deconstructionism, new historicism. Rather than attempting a broad survey, the course will expose students to three or four schools of criticism in greater depth. Students will practice each critical method and develop a Christian critique of it. Junior or senior English majors, or others with permission of the instructor. Three hours.

Designed for the student who has demonstrated potential ability for independent study, this course allows him or her to choose and to explore, under the guidance of an instructor, an area of literature or language not fully covered in available courses. Credit to be determined in each case; maximum credit, three hours per semester.

This course offers opportunities for concentration in various topics of interest within the discipline. Topics that may be offered include specialized literary topics, literary criticism, and American studies. Prerequisite: open to English majors and minors with junior or senior standing, to others only with the permission of the instructor. Three hours. ‘S’

A study of Shakespeare’s dramatic and literary art. Prerequisite: ENG 201 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

This research methods course is required of all seniors and must be completed prior to enrolling in ENG 492. SIP. Students will study the art of scholarly research, conduct research for an approved SIP paper or project, and produce a bibliography in MLA style. One hour.

This course is required of all students majoring in English. The student will explore and analyze a topic related to the discipline of English in the light of Christian philosophy. The study will ordinarily result in a written thesis, though other sorts of projects are permitted if approved by the student’s first reader. Upon completion of the paper or project, there is a final oral exam. Prerequisite: ENG 491. Two hours.

 

Spring 2014 Departmental Course Offerings
(click column title to sort)
Subject Course# Course Title Days Beginsort icon End Instructor
ENG 201 Intro to Literary Studies Tate, Bill
ENG 418 Shakespeare Tate, Bill
ENG 446 Practicum in Journalism Foreman, Cliff
ENG 111 English Composition TR 0800 0915 Tate, Bill
ENG 111 English Composition MWF 0900 0950 Barham, Robert Erle
ENG 352 Contemporary Literature TR 0930 1015 Macallister, Gwen
ENG 111 English Composition TR 0930 1045 Minich, Linnea
ENG 343 Amer Lit: Beginnings to 1865 MWF 1000 1050 Foreman, Cliff
ENG 203 Amer Lit: Beginnings to 1865 MWF 1000 1050 Foreman, Cliff
ENG 418 Shakespeare MWF 1000 1050 Tate, Bill
ENG 252 Speech TR 1100 1150 Smithson, John
ENG 492 Senior Integration Paper R 1200 1250 Macallister, Gwen
ENG 491 SIP: Research T 1200 1250 Macallister, Gwen
ENG 111 English Composition MWF 1300 1350 Huffines, Sarah
ENG 304 Advanced Composition TR 1300 1415 Barham, Robert Erle
ENG 303 Creative Writing: Nonfiction TR 1300 1350 Huffines, Sarah
ENG 050 Basic Writing MW 1400 1450 Huffines, Sarah
ENG 201 Intro to Literary Studies MWF 1400 1450 Tate, Bill
ENG 401 Special Topics in English TR 1430 1545 Foreman, Cliff
ENG 111 English Composition MWF 1500 1550 Ralston, Patricia
ENG 266 Reading Film MWF 1500 1550 Foreman, Cliff
ENG 111 English Composition MW 1600 1715 Macallister, Gwen
ENG 240 Inklings MW 1600 1715 Ralston, Patricia
ENG 311 Chaucer and the Middle Ages TR 1600 1715 Ralston, Patricia
ENG 266 Reading Film M 1900 2200 Foreman, Cliff

 

Linguistics Courses (LIN)

This course offers a non-technical introduction to the study of linguistics and is organized around common ideas and misconceptions about language. Students will assess evidence and opinions about a variety of popular linguistic topics, including bilingualism, language and gender, stigmatized dialects of English, language change, sign language, language disorders, language and thought, and animal communication. Three hours. HUM

This course introduces students to the systematic study of human language. The course surveys the major subfields of linguistics: the study of sounds and sound patterns (phonetics and phonology); words and their parts (morphology); and the structure, meaning, and use of phrases and sentences (syntax, semantics, and pragmatics). The focus is on analyzing language data. Additional topics may include language learning, historical language change, and social aspects of language variation and use. Three hours. SSC

This course integrates theory and practice in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Participants will assess a variety of language teaching methods, discuss pedagogical insights from current research on second language acquisition, and examine features of English that are particularly challenging for learners. Three hours.

This course offers a systematic study of the structure of phrases and sentences. Students will gain practical experience forming and testing linguistic hypotheses using data from a variety of languages. The focus is more on analyzing language data and less on surveying the historical development of syntactic theory. Attention is also given to applications in language teaching and learning. Prerequisite: LIN 150. Three hours.

This course examines how speech sounds are organized within individual languages. Students will learn about the relationships between sounds and the ways sounds combine with and influence each other. The focus is on analyzing phonological data from diverse languages, including non-Indo-European languages. Attention is also given to applications in speech pathology, dialectology, language learning, and linguistic theory. Prerequisite: LIN 150 or FRE 320. Three hours.

This course offers opportunities for concentration in advanced topics of interest within linguistics. Prerequisite: LIN 150 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

This course provides a study of language as social practice. The course highlights the ways language changes depending on the sociocultural context and emphasizes the interaction between language and social factors such as class, community, age, ethnicity, gender, power, and religion. Prerequisite: LIN 150 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

This course examines how children learn language. Emphasis is placed on the processes and stages of language development in early childhood, current empirical findings in the field, and theoretical issues surrounding language acquisition. Students will also gain practical experience collecting and analyzing child language data. Prerequisite: LIN 150 or PSY 303 or permission of the instructor. Three hours.

 

Spring 2014 Departmental Course Offerings
(click column title to sort)
Subject Course# Course Title Days Beginsort icon End Instructor
LIN 315 Phonology MWF 1000 1050 Stephens, Nola
LIN 150 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 1300 1350 Stephens, Nola
LIN 401 Special Topics TR 1430 1545 Stephens, Nola